Episode 79 – Insert Witty Title Here

2014-03-23-9f3f51b5– by Foxtrot
The Michaels are back this week, even though the day jobs are catching us all and consuming more and more time. We are feeling it in our reduction of gaming that we can do – so we followup on last week’s blog post on games Michael R. is no longer playing. During the course of our discussion, Michael M. decides that he too should post a blog post on the games that he is no longer play too. What is the tipping point that makes a game no longer fun? Should a game for work be fun, or just engaging? Speaking of engagement, we then look at how the NCAA drives more engagement into the game of basketball during March Madness. Including the crazy new contest with Warren Buffet and Quicken Loans “Perfect Bracket” game. Does basketball really need more engagement (Michael R)? Can basketball get more engagement (Michael M)?

Michael R. doesn’t really think that quarter end and tournament brackets don’t align very well, due to the winner take all / win lose situation that tournaments promote verses the quarter end drive to ship products. Michael M. looks at how this is true for traditional periodic events, however, when there is a major event (non-repeating) there are good opportunities to use a tournament push. We also look at the various different motivational / reward systems which make the most sense for the appropriate business event. When do you like to play the Grinding games verses the Big Event games? Which aligns best to your work environment? We would love to hear from you on the games that engage you the most.

Show Links:
Games I am no longer playing
World Of Warcraft – Time Travel Expansion
Time Travel Games
Nest Smoke Alarm
Systems of Engagement
The Last Perfect Bracket Fails
Hannover Messe:Industrial Automation, Energy, Industrial Supply Chain and more Conference
MacWorld Expo

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Episode 26 – Business Process Management and Immortality

Phaedra and Michael M, missing Michael R, have a very rare in person walk through memory lane conversation on how the Innov8 game was used to help explain Business Process Modeling, and how rapidly it was adopted buy universities all over the world.  Such repurposing first person shooter and then later real time strategy game engines in support of marketing and understanding BPM was highly successful in many ways.

Phaedra expanded on the subject by commenting that now, such process optimization games are being used to help expose the optimized new processes as a byproduct of gameplay, by how the game players actually play the game.  One of the best things about games is that they reduce the focus to the most important parts of the subject, removing all else.  This is a continuing thread, reminding us of the conversations had with Ian Bogost and Chris Hazard on earlier episodes.  Gameplay helps to optimize the process because of the focus on the most salient part of the game, and when there are real world elements incorporated, the game can make sense of the deluge of data because of the players who are playing.

For her saving throw, Phaedra shares that process optimization games are a hot topic — per Garnter & Forrester, 50% of organizations that are focusing on process optimization will be using games.  And for Michael’s saving throw, he muses on immortality and how the digital breadcrumbs that we leave everywhere could form the input to artificial intelligence agents which could consume all this information, and then provide insight as to how an individual may approach a problem or answer a question, long after that person is no more.

And with this, we’re taken right back to the start of the show with business process modeling as a strong method of capturing corporate memory.

additional links

 

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